The Bull Ring in NorthwichLooking up the High Street in NorthwichLooking up Witton Street in NorthwichApproaching Weaver Square from Witton Street in NorthwichTown Square in Weaver Square Shopping CentreMarket Way in the Weaver Square Shopping CentreLooking down Witton Street in NorthwichNorthwich Library on Witton Street

The Bull Ring in Northwich

Looking up the High Street in Northwich

Looking up Witton Street in Northwich

Approaching Weaver Square from Witton Street in Northwich

Town Square in Weaver Square Shopping Centre

Market Way in the Weaver Square Shopping Centre

Looking down Witton Street in Northwich

Northwich Library on Witton Street

Heritage Tour - Bletchley Park
Northwich Memorial Court
Saturday 26th May 2018
This is an old event, please click here to find more events

We spend the day at Bletchley Park, just outside Milton Keynes. Bletchley Park is a place of exceptional historical importance. It is the home of British codebreaking and a birthplace of modern information technology. It played a major role in World War Two, producing secret intelligence which had a direct and profound influence on the outcome of the conflict.

The Enigma coding machine offered 159 million million million possible settings to choose from, which the Germans believed unbreakable. The Poles had broken Enigma in as early as 1932, but in 1939 with the prospect of war, the Poles decided to inform the British of their successes. Dilly Knox, one of the former British World War One Codebreakers, was convinced he could break the system and set up an Enigma Research Section, comprising himself and Tony Kendrick, later joined by Peter Twinn, Alan Turing and Gordon Welchman. They worked in the stable yard at Bletchley Park and that is where the first wartime Enigma messages were broken in January 1940. Enigma traffic continued to be broken routinely at Bletchley Park for the remainder of the war.

Perhaps Bletchley Park's greatest success was breaking the Germans' strategic ciphers. These complex ciphers were used to secure communications between Berlin and Army commanders in the field. Messages consisted of teleprinter code encyphered with the highly complex Lorenz cypher machine. Under Professor Max Newman the ‘Newmanry’ started to devise machines to mechanise the process of decoding. This ultimately led to the design and construction by the brilliant General Post Office (GPO) engineer Tommy Flowers of ‘Colossus’, the world’s first semi-programmable electronic computer. Breaking into these ciphers allowed the Allied staff planning for the invasion of Europe to obtain unprecedented detail of the German defences, and to see into the minds of the enemy commanders including Hitler himself. See a reconstruction of Colossus on display.

We visit on a 1940s reenactment day, with military vehicles, live music, demonstrations and costumed characters on display.You're welcome to come along in period costume!

 

Coach leaves Winsford @ 7.30am through to Northwich Memorial Court @ 8.00am
Full list of pickup points and times here - schedule (a).
£25 (entry fees extra) - book online
or phone Carol on 07932927694 to reserve your ticket

Please Note: Whilst we strive to keep our information up to date, this information can change without notice.
Please check parking restrictions before leaving your vehicle.

Location:

Northwich Memorial Court
Chesterway
Northwich
Cheshire
CW9 5QJ

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Please Note: The information regarding this event was correct at the date of publication. Whilst we strive to keep our information up to date, this information can change without notice. Please check with the event before attending.

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